Author Interviews

Varina Denman

Varina Denman is a native Texan who spent her high school years in a rural Texas town, so writing the Mended Hearts series has allowed her to reminisce about her small town memories. She and her husband live near Fort Worth, where they enjoy spending time with their five mostly-grown children and their elderly Pomeranian.

Q: When you are writing, what treat do you like to keep you going?
A: Chocolate! Lots of it!

Q: Tell me about why/how you chose the genre you write in and what about it appeals to you?
A: That’s a funny question for me, because I’m not sure how it happened. My first book didn’t fit neatly into a genre, and it took me quite a while to figure-out how to market it to agents and publishers. With much help from friends, I finally decided on “Women’s Fiction with Strong Romance.” Even though I never set-out to write in that genre, the stories that land on the keyboard definitely fit.

Q: If you were to pick one character out of your books that could materialize and become a real live person, a friend, who would it be and why.
A: Milla Cunningham, from Jaded. She’s not a main character, but rather, the hero’s mother. She’s about my age, and I think we could be good friends. However, Milla is the kind of woman who radiates wisdom and thoughtfulness, so I get the feeling she could teach me a thing or two.

Q: What do you do to get into “the zone” when you are writing?
A: It depends on which stage of the writing process I’m involved in at the time. If I’m still plotting my draft, then I do a lot of mindless housework and long walks. If I’m cranking-out the first draft, then I need absolute quiet and no interruptions. If I’m doing the months and months of edits … I’m not sure. There seems to be no efficient way to find the zone then. I usually sit in front of the laptop a while, then surf Pinterest, then clean the desk, then shuffle through my notes. After a few hours, I sometimes find myself in the zone, and then I edit like a crazy woman before the mood evaporates.

Q: Please give me one fun fact about yourself that readers may not know.
A: I am “blessed” with naturally curly hair that I have fought my entire life. I’m currently growing-out the bangs I’ve had for two decades, and I’m not sure I’m going to survive this one.

Melony, thanks for inviting me to your blog. I’ve enjoyed being here!


READ MELONY’s REVIEW OF JUSTIDIED

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Connect with Varina on her website: varinadenman.com

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Congratulations-PS-750THE WINNER OF THE BOOK GIVEAWAY IS KATHLEEN CLARK

Melony Teague is a Freelance Writer and Columnist who lives in Richmond Hill, Ontario. The Biographer for Portraits of Giving (2014-2016), Aurora Sports Hall of Fame (2015 -2017) and teaches seniors in her community how to write their personal story.

10 Comments

  • Kathleen Clark

    I find that we are always harder on ourselves and hold ourselves up to a higher standard than we do those around us or even in our families. Sometimes I think it has to do with being an older sibling (not necessary the oldest sibling). It also had to do with being raised not to bring damage to the family name.

  • Terrill Rosado

    I forgive very easily. That is saying, I haven’t had anything too extreme (to me, anyway) that was worth the sin of not forgiving. I hope that I can continue to say that as time goes on. I haven’t thought too much about forgiving myself, because that requires too much introspection. What I do know is that God still forgives me even when I don’t deserve it.

  • Lea Ladehoff

    I think it’s hard to forgive ourselves because we have trouble letting go and moving on. I know I tend to beat myself up over something, even when I’ve already given it to God.

  • Stephanie C.

    That is a good question. Maybe in part it is because we live in our own skin and head 24/7. We tend to think things over and over. With someone else, we can forgive and have some space from the issue.

    I have been hearing wonderful things about Varina’s books. I really look forward to reading them. Thank you for sharing this interview and for the opportunity to win a book.

    Stephanie C.

  • Andrea McCulley

    I am very happy to learn about this author and series. I do think most of the time that it is easier for me to forgive others rather than myself. I think it is because I struggle with perfection and having high expectations for myself. I am slowly learning to let go and find more freedom in grace. Thank you for the opportunity to win! This book sounds awesome!

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